3 FOODS THAT ARE NOT ANXIETY FRIENDLY

Watch what you eat and take control of your anxiety

Mental health disorders affect more than 450 million people, worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that one in four people are affected by mental disorders at some point in their lives. These mental disorders range from depression, anxiety and more.

Anxiety disorder is the most common form of mental health disorder, and it can affect anyone at any age.

However, did you know? Anxiety may be triggered by certain types of foods and beverages that we consume in our daily lives. It’s time to be more conscious of what we put in our body. Here are three edibles that may trigger your anxiety:

#1 CAFFEINE

A cup of coffee is a much-needed beverage for a lot of people to get through their day. However, excessive consumption of products that are high in caffeine is a big trigger of anxiety and nervousness.

Experts also point out that caffeine decreases the production of a feel-good chemical known as serotonin in the body, hence causing a depressed mood. Food and beverages that contain high caffeine levels include coffee, energy drinks, coffee flavoured ice-cream and more.

#2 ALCOHOL

Seen as liquid courage by many, alcohol consumption might contribute adverse effects to some. According to experts, alcohol changes levels of serotonin and neurotransmitters in the brain.

These changes in serotonin levels can make the anxiety worse. As the alcohol wears off, you might even regret drinking it in the first place as experts believe it can intensify the feeling of anxiousness.

#3 SUGARY FOOD

Many have turned to sugary food or drinks for an extra boost after a long day. That sweet feeling of sugar-rush fills us with a spark of energy and makes us feel invincible. However, that feeling only lasts temporarily and the effects it leaves behind is not that sweet.

Post sugar-rush effects include fatigue, sluggishness, jittery feelings, irritation and increased thirst. Research also indicates that sugary treats have no positive effects on the mood.

Source: World Health Organization, Healthline